Aircraft Carrier Joins U.S. Fleet

Aircraft Carrier Joins U.S. Fleet


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Aircraft carrier

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Aircraft carrier, naval vessel from which airplanes may take off and on which they may land. As early as November 1910, an American civilian pilot, Eugene Ely, flew a plane off a specially built platform on the deck of the U.S. cruiser Birmingham at Hampton Roads, Virginia. On January 18, 1911, in San Francisco Bay, Ely landed on a platform built on the quarterdeck of the battleship Pennsylvania, using wires attached to sandbags on the platform as arresting gear he then took off from the same ship.

What is an aircraft carrier?

An aircraft carrier is a naval vessel from which airplanes may take off and land. Basically, an aircraft carrier is an airfield at sea. Special features include catapults on the flight deck to assist in launching aircraft for braking while landing, aircraft are fitted with retractable hooks that engage wires on the deck.

Who was the first pilot to take off from a platform on a ship, a forerunner of the aircraft carrier?

American civilian Eugene Ely was the first pilot to fly a plane off a specially built platform on the deck of the U.S. cruiser Birmingham at Hampton Roads, Virginia, in November 1910. These experimental platforms led to the development of true aircraft carriers.

What was the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier?

The first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was the Enterprise, launched by the United States on September 24, 1960.

Were aircraft carriers used in World War II?

Aircraft carriers were used from the early stages of World War II. They became the dominant combat vessel after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, demonstrated their potential. They also played a leading role in the battles of Midway Island, Coral Sea, and Leyte Gulf.

What ship was the first aircraft carrier?

During World War I the British navy developed the first true aircraft carrier with an unobstructed flight deck, the HMS Argus, which was built on a converted merchant-ship hull. A Japanese carrier, the Hosyo, which entered service in December 1922, was the first carrier designed as such from the keel up.

The British navy also experimented with the carrier during World War I it developed the first true carrier with an unobstructed flight deck, the HMS Argus, built on a converted merchant-ship hull. The war ended before the Argus could be put into action, but the U.S. and Japanese navies quickly followed the British example. The first U.S. carrier, a converted collier renamed the USS Langley, joined the fleet in March 1922. A Japanese carrier, the Hosyo, which entered service in December 1922, was the first carrier designed as such from the keel up.

Fundamentally, the carrier is an airfield at sea with many special features necessitated by limitations in size and the medium in which it operates. To facilitate short takeoffs and landings, airspeeds over the deck are increased by turning the ship into the wind. Catapults flush with the flight deck assist in launching aircraft for landing, aircraft are fitted with retractable hooks that engage transverse wires on the deck, braking them to a quick stop.

The control centres of a carrier are situated in the superstructure (the “island”), at one side of the flight deck. Aircraft landings are guided by radio and radar and by visual signals from the deck.

Carriers were first used in combat during the early stages of World War II. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor by carrier-based planes on December 7, 1941, dramatically demonstrated the potential of the aircraft carrier, which thereafter was the dominant combat vessel of the war. The carrier played leading roles in the sea battles of the Pacific theatre, such as Midway Island, Coral Sea, and Leyte Gulf.

Carriers built after the war were larger and had armoured flight decks. Jet aircraft posed serious problems because of their greater weight, slower acceleration, higher landing speeds, and greater fuel consumption. Three British innovations contributed toward solution of these problems: a steam-powered catapult, an angled, or canted, flight deck, and a mirror landing-signal system.

On September 24, 1960, the first nuclear-powered carrier, the Enterprise, was launched by the United States. It had no need for the fuel bunkers, smokestacks, and ducts for the elimination of exhaust gases that had occupied space in previous carriers.

Subsequent design modifications produced such variations as the light carrier, equipped with large amounts of electronic gear for the detection of submarines, and the helicopter carrier, intended for conducting amphibious assault. Another development was the substitution of missile armament for much of the former antiaircraft firepower. Carriers with combined capabilities are classified as multipurpose carriers.


USS Carl Vinson

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is the United States Navy's third Nimitz-class supercarrier. She is named for Carl Vinson, a Congressman from Georgia, in recognition of his contributions to the U.S. Navy. The ship was launched in 1980, undertook her maiden voyage in 1983, and underwent refueling and overhaul between 2005 and 2009.

Besides deployments in Operation Desert Strike, Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Southern Watch, and Operation Enduring Freedom, Carl Vinson was involved in a number of notable events. The body of Osama bin Laden was buried at sea in 2011 from the deck of Carl Vinson, and that same year, on Veterans Day, she played host to the first NCAA basketball game on an aircraft carrier, between North Carolina and Michigan State.


George Washington: A U.S. Navy Aircraft Carrier Like No Other

The sixth Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the fourth United States Navy vessel to be named for commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the first president of the United States, USS George Washington (CVN-73) is currently undergoing her four-year Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). The warship is on track to have the work completed by September of this year, and will soon be ready to operate for another twenty-five years.

In addition to the refueling of the nuclear reactors, the ship’s combat systems and other warfighting capabilities are being upgraded – so that George Washington will leave the shipyard as one of the world’s most technologically advanced capital warships in the world.

USS George Washington, a History

Laid down in August 1986, the carrier was launched in July 1990 and two years later on July 4, 1992, was commissioned. Commonly known by the nickname “GW,” the supercarrier can carry upwards of ninety fix-wing and rotary aircraft.

President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Clinton led an entourage of the nation’s leaders on board the carrier on June 5, 1994, to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the D-Day landings in Normandy, France. Later that warship was dispatched to the Persian Gulf, where she took part in Operation Vigilant Warrior to protect Kuwait from a second invasion by Iraq. Joined by the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LPH-10), along with 2,000 Marines of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, the arrival of the carrier convinced Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein to withdraw his Republican Guard Forces. In November of 1994 Iraq officially recognized an independent Kuwait.

Following the September 11 terrorist attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, USS George Washington, along with the carriers USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), was deployed to protect the United States from potential attacks. During the subsequent sixth deployment, CVN-73 traveled to the Gulf of Aden and conducted operations in the Persian Gulf.

In December 2005, it was announced by the United States Navy that USS George Washington would replace USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) as the forward-deployed carrier at the U.S. Yokosuka Naval Base in Japan. CVN-73 became the first nuclear-powered surface warship permanently stationed outside the continental United States.

A fire broke out in the vicinity of the carrier’s aft air conditioning and refrigeration space and auxiliary boiler room in May 2008, and spread to several spaces via a cableway and caused extreme heat in some of the ship spaces. While it was contained and extinguished by the crew without any serious injuries to personnel, it took several hours to completely contain and extinguish the fire. The ship’s crew was at general quarters for approximately 12 hours.


Five Reasons The Navy's Aircraft Carriers Are Becoming More Vital To U.S. Security

One of the most persistent fashions in military circles is predicting the demise of the aircraft carrier. It has become an article of faith among many analysts that the world's biggest warships can't hide in an era of precision-guided missiles and reconnaissance satellites, and it's just a matter of time before some upstart military power like China proves the point. The more colorful accounts of why carriers will be a waning factor in warfare describe a "line of death" in the seas near China that can't be crossed without courting catastrophe.

No doubt about it, carriers and the other warships that accompany them in a strike group constitute a lucrative target set. Losing even one of the Navy's ten carriers would be a national trauma. However, these concerns have been around for a long time Donald Rumsfeld was talking about them during his first run as defense secretary in the 1970s. There hasn't been much hard evidence during the intervening decades that carrier vulnerability is increasing. The Navy invests heavily in applying cutting-edge technology to the defense of its carrier strike groups -- making them among the most densely defended assets in the world.

What is increasing is the utility of carriers in responding to a growing array of global challenges. Roughly 80% of the world's population lives within a hundred miles of the sea, so having a fleet of floating air bases that can destroy hundreds of targets per day for months at a time without requiring access to land facilities is useful. In fact, large-deck, nuclear-powered aircraft carriers are the signature combat systems of the U.S. military -- a capability uniquely suited to America's global security role.

This isn't just rhetoric: the Chief of Naval Operations testified last week before Congress that his carriers can barely keep up with the tempo of demand from combatant commanders in places like the Middle East and Western Pacific. He figures carrier deployments should last about seven months to be sustainable, but they've actually been averaging nine months -- which is wearing out both the ships and their crews. So if demand signals are any indication, reports of the carrier's demise are greatly exaggerated. Here are five reasons why the Navy's flattops will become more important to U.S. security in the future, rather than gradually relinquishing their role.

No other country in the world has a fleet of large-deck, nuclear-powered aircraft carriers like the . [+] USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, pictured above. Displacing 100,000 tons of water and standing over 20 stories high, these vessels are the biggest warships ever built. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rafael Figueroa Medina/Released)

Carriers are more survivable than land bases. The notion that carriers are losing their warfighting value because they are vulnerable is almost comically wrong. They are much more survivable than the overseas bases on which the Air Force and Army would have to depend for the simple reason that carriers are always moving. The location of every U.S. land base in Eurasia is well known to adversaries, and in a major war the most critical bases would quickly be wiped out. Aircraft carriers, on the other hand, move so fast they can outrun submarines, so keeping track of where they are is not easy. In wartime, carrier strike groups would keep hostile aircraft (including drones) at bay, and quickly disable enemy targeting systems.

Carriers are becoming more capable. The Navy is building a new Ford class of carriers that will generate 300% more electricity than existing carriers while increasing daily aircraft sortie rates by about 25%. The really big change in the near term, though, is introduction of F-35C joint strike fighters on carrier decks which can fly 40% further than legacy aircraft without refueling. The greater reach of the F-35C, combined with stealth that makes it invisible to radar and networked sensors to enhance situational awareness, will make carriers and their air wings more lethal, more survivable.

Carriers are becoming more available. In the years since the Cold War ended, the number of carriers in the active fleet has decreased while the demand for their overseas deployment has increased. As a result, the percentage of the carrier force deployed each year has risen from less than 20% to over 30% -- a rate that cannot be sustained once the time needed for training and maintenance is figured in. The Navy is taking two steps to assure carriers will be available to regional commanders when needed. First, an optimized Fleet Response Plan will better reconcile the competing demands made on carriers. Second, the number of carriers will increase when the USS Ford joins the active fleet in 2021. This should allow a return to sustainable rates of deployment.

Carriers are more economical than alternatives. Because aircraft carriers last for 50 years, the Navy only needs to buy one every five years to sustain its current fleet -- which works out to about six hours of federal spending annually. The cost of keeping three carrier strike groups (with destroyers and subs) continuously deployed overseas is a fraction of one-percent of federal spending. But the cost of waging war by other means could be much higher. The Air Force needs a basing network everywhere it might fight, since unlike carriers land bases can't be moved. And the smart bombs carrier-based aircraft use to destroy targets cost $25,000, whereas a cruise missile would cost $1.5 million to destroy the same target. Multiply the latter number by thousands of targets, and you're talking real money.

Carriers are more politically acceptable than alternatives. If the Air Force and the Army are going to have the regional basing infrastructure required for them to sustain a military campaign, Washington may need to make deals with a lot of unsavory local leaders. Even after agreements have been inked, there's no way of knowing whether unfettered use of bases will be permitted in any particular contingency. Relying on sea-based forces to prosecute a war effort largely eliminates these political problems, so the U.S. does not end up subsidizing leaders who are corrupt or oppressive in order to execute its strategy. Current aircraft carriers can launch nearly 200 aircraft sorties per day if necessary, which is comparable to having a major base ashore -- without all the difficulties.

When you add up the many advantages that large-deck, nuclear-powered aircraft carriers confer on U.S. warfighters, it is not hard to see why they are likely to remain the centerpiece of America's global military posture. They have unlimited range, they can quickly be moved wherever they are needed, they deliver enough offensive punch to defeat most adversaries quickly, and they are less vulnerable to preemption or political controversy than land bases would be. Although threats are increasing, carriers are exceedingly difficult to sink and the likelihood most enemies could even find them, much less penetrate their layered defenses, is small. The only immediate danger to the carrier fleet is that Washington will drop the ball on funding new construction.

Huntington Ingalls Industries , the nation's sole builder of aircraft carriers, is a modest contributor to my think tank.


The U.S. Navy Might Retire an Aircraft Carrier with 25 Years of Life Left

In March, news circulated that the U.S. Navy was considering revisiting a 2019 proposal that would result in USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), the eighth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, being taken out of service to save the cost of the warship’s upcoming refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH). Already there has been bipartisan opposition to retire the supercarrier.

“The bottom line is, getting rid of ships when you’re trying to re-build the Navy is not a smart decision,” said Rep. Elaine Luria (D-Virginia) during a talk with the Hudson Institute in response to the news that the carrier might face the chopping block.

“You know, people can make the argument that I don’t buy, that, we’ll save some money immediately because we won’t spend money to refuel it,” added Luria, who is a member of the House Armed Services Committee. “But there’s a lot of sunk costs in this carrier, with 25 years left in its life. And decommissioning it is obviously not going to be a long-term money-saving proposition.”

USS Harry S. Truman, a History

CVN-75, nicknamed HST and Lone Warrior, is the first warship to be named for the thirty-third president of the United States (POTUS), Harry S. Truman. She is currently homeported at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia.

Launched in 1996 and commissioned in July 1998, Harry S. Truman was initially the flagship of Carrier Group Two (CG-2), and later as the flagship of Carrier Strike Group 10 (CSG-10) and Carrier Strike Group 8 (CSG-8).

As with other Nimitz-class carriers, CVN-75 is powered by two nuclear reactors, which give her almost unlimited range as well as the ability to stay at sea almost indefinitely. As a floating military airport, the carrier is 1,092 feet long while its flight deck is about 4.5 acres. The warship is home at sea to approximately 3,200 sailors and Marines as well as nearly 2,500 additional personnel that make up the Air Wing.

The carrier’s embarked air wing consists of eight to nine squadrons of fixed-wing and rotary aircraft including Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornets, EA-18G Growlers, MH-60Rs, MH-60Ss and E-2C Hawkeyes. As with other carriers in her class, CVN-75 can utilize her four catapults and four arresting gear engines to launch and recover aircraft rapidly and simultaneously.

In addition to serving as POTUS, Captain Harry Truman served as commanding officer of the U.S. Army’s 129th Field Artillery Regiment of the 35th Division. His service is honored by USS Harry S. Truman’s battle flag, which features crossed cannons and the motto, “Give ‘Em Hell” – a reference to President Truman’s hard fought re-election campaign in 1948 during a stop in Seattle someone yelled, “Give ’em hell, Harry!”

While Truman later wrote, “I have never deliberately given anyone hell,” the carrier bearing his name has likely been an adversary’s worst nightmare. She has won numerous awards that recognize the ship’s excellence including the Battenberg Cup (2003), multiple Battle “E” awards, and notably the Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award, which is given to the most battle-ready ship in the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. She won that award twice, first in 2004 and again in 2009.

During the early stages of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, air wing aircrews flew nearly 1,300 combat sorties from the Mediterranean Sea, while in 2004 as part of a Navy-wide series of re-designations became the immediate superior in command (ISIC) of CSG-10 and headed to the Persian Gulf. Harry S. Truman and Carrier Air Wing 3 (CAW-3) launched 2,577 sorties, totaling nearly 13,000 flight hours, flying combat missions over Iraq. In 2016, the carrier as flagship of CSG-8 took part in an eight-month air operation against ISIS as part of Operation Inherent Resolve.

In addition to combat operations, Lone Warrior has taken part in multiple humanitarian missions including responding to 2005’s Hurricane Katrina.


Why 11 Navy Aircraft Carriers Simply Aren't Enough

The service's carrier fleet needs more ships&mdashor fewer missions.

  • The Admiral in line to become the head of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command said the Navy does not need more than 11 aircraft carriers.
  • The U.S. Navy is limited by law to a minimum of 11 carriers.
  • The frantic pace of recent carrier deployments makes it clear the Navy needs more carriers&mdashor fewer missions for them.

The upcoming head of U.S. forces in the Indo-Pacific believes the Navy has all the aircraft carriers it needs&mdashunless a new threat rears its head.

The comments come after years of reports of overworked aircraft carrier crews, culminating in the USS Nimitz&rsquos recent, record-breaking 10-month deployment. If the Navy doesn&rsquot need more carriers, then it seems pretty clear it needs fewer missions for carriers.

⚓️ You love badass ships. So do we. Let&rsquos nerd out over them together.

Adm. John Aquilino, nominated to head U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, made the comments during his Senate confirmation hearings last week. In the hearings, Sen. Roger Wicker asked Aquilino if 11 aircraft carriers is sufficient for the Navy:

Wicker represents the state of Mississippi, home to one of Huntington Ingalls Industries&rsquo (HII) naval shipyards. But HII builds aircraft carriers in Virginia&mdashnot Mississippi.

Recent news reports strongly suggest the size of the Navy&rsquos current carrier force simply isn&rsquot enough.

By law, the Navy is required to operate a minimum of 11 aircraft carriers. And while Wicker is correct that the service has 11 carriers, that doesn&rsquot tell the whole story. The 11th carrier, the new USS Gerald R. Ford, is currently non-deployable. The ship, whose first operational patrol was originally scheduled for 2018, is hung up on technical issues and may not conduct its first patrol until 2024.

In the meantime, the Navy&rsquos remaining 10 carriers have faced a grueling schedule that&rsquos wearing out ships and crews.

During the Cold War, the Navy&rsquos 13 to 15 carriers and attached air wings typically spent about 6 months (180 days) at a time at sea. But those deployments have steadily grown longer as the carrier fleet has grown smaller. In January 2020, the USS Abraham Lincoln wrapped up a 295-day patrol. Also last year, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower spent 200 days at sea, while the Nay sent USS Theodore Roosevelt on a &ldquodouble pump&rdquo of back-to-back deployments.

In 2020, Navy carriers spent a combined total of 855 days at sea&mdash258 days more than all of 2019, according to U.S. Naval Institute News.

If you have 10 aircraft carriers, that doesn&rsquot mean you have 10 aircraft carriers that are ready for action at all times. Carriers typically abide by the one-third rule that governs most fleets: At any one given time, one-third of ships are patrol, one third are preparing for or just coming off patrol, and another third are in maintenance at the shipyard.

In emergencies, many (but not all) ships preparing for patrol can be surged early and ships returning can delay their returns. So, at any one given time, four out of 11 carriers might be available for operations, and up to five or six in emergencies.

What exacerbated the recent pace of operations? Combine COVID-19 pre-deployment quarantines an on-again, off-again crisis with Iran and USS Ford&rsquos inability to deploy, which will leave the East Coast carrier fleet with just one carrier, USS Eisenhower, until mid-2021, per USNI News.

The addition of USS Ford would only partially fix the problem. The Ford is an Atlantic Fleet carrier, and the Navy&rsquos Pacific Fleet carriers, like the USS Lincoln, are also heavily stressed. Adding a 12th carrier to the Pacific Fleet would help alleviate the stress on the entire fleet.

Could the Navy get by on 10 or 11 carriers? Yes&mdashif it chose to substitute other ships for carriers, or reduce the missions requiring a carrier.

The Zumwalt-class destroyers or future versions of the Virginia-class submarines, equipped with hypersonic and anti-ship missiles, could substitute the firepower of a carrier in a pinch. The Navy could also decide it doesn&rsquot need a carrier in certain regions all the time, particularly against Iran and the South China Sea. But what kind of signal would that send to potential adversaries?

Still, one thing seems clear: For the Navy of today, 10 or even 11 carriers aren&rsquot enough for the task. The Navy needs more carriers, more carrier substitutes, or fewer missions.


Active U.S. Air Carrier and General Aviation Fleet by Type of Aircraft

Prior to 1970, aircraft counts included aircraft retained in FAA data systems until the owners requested that they be deregistered. As a result, thousands of aircraft that had been destroyed over the years remained in the system. Since 1970, annual verification of aircraft registrations is required. Failure to comply with this requirement leads to revocation of the registration certificate and exclusion of the aircraft from the official count of the following year. Listed engine configurations (e.g., Two-, Three-, Multi-) represent all applicable combinations for each aircraft type. Totals may not agree with those in other tables as revisions to prior year data are reported at the aggregate level only.

Details may not add up to totals due to rounding in the source.

Estimates from the 2011 GA Survey are currently not available. The FAA is engaged in re-calibration efforts. 2011 data on the table are from FAA's Aviation Forecast estimates.

Beginning in 2004, commuter activity is excluded from all estimates.

Prior to 2012, estimates for experimental light-sport aircraft were not included in the experimental category. In 2009 and 2010, the totals shown for experimental aircraft were manually calculated by summing the figures from amateur, exhibition, experimental light-sport, and other experimental. Due to the manual summation of experimental total, the percent standard error cannot be calculated.

From 1995 to 2009, numbers for active fleet under air carrier may not add to totals due to different sources.

Subcategories data under air carrier are no longer provided by the FAA after 2008.

KEY: R = revised U = data are unavailable.

a Air carrier aircraft are aircraft carrying passengers or cargo for hire under 14 CFR 121 (large aircraft-more than 30 seats) and 14 CFR 135 (small aircraft-30 seats or less). This definition is more encompassing than that in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation Forecast- jet aircraft, 60 seats or more carrying passengers or cargo for hire. Beginning in 1990, the number of aircraft is the monthly average reported in use for the last three months of the year. Prior to 1990, it was the number of aircraft reported in use during December of a given year.

b Details may not add to totals due to estimation procedures and rounding. Beginning in 1993, excludes commuters. Prior to 1993, single-engine turboprops were included in Turboprop, Other single and multiengine turbine rotorcraft were not shown separately Gliders and Lighter-than-air aircraft were combined into the Other category and Experimental aircraft were included in the appropriate aircraft type for example, prior to 1993, the Piston, One engine aircraft type included both experimental and nonexperimental aircraft. Starting in 1993, that aircraft type only includes nonexperimental aircraft. Due to changes in methodology beginning in 1995, estimates may not be comparable to those for 1994 and earlier years.


Aircraft Carrier Joins U.S. Fleet - HISTORY

The George Washington (CVN 73) is the sixth ship in the Nimitz-class aircraft carriers and the fourth United States Navy ship to be named after George Washington, the first President of the United States. The contract was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company on December 27, 1982. The keel was laid on August 25, 1986, it was christened July 21, 1990, by First Lady Barbara Bush, and was commissioned at Naval Station Norfolk on July 4, 1992.

January 9, 1993 USS George Washington entered the dry-dock at Newport News Shipbuilding for a Post Shakedown Availability (PSA).

January 23, Capt. Robert G. Sprigg relieved Capt. Robert M. Nutwell as commanding officer of the George Washington during ceremony held at hangar LP2 on Naval Air Station Norfolk.

May 14, USS George Washington departed for a six -day sea trials in the VACAPES Op. Area.

From June 16-30, the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I in the Virginia Capes OPAREA.

From July 19 through Aug. 2, the George Washington was underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) and TSTA IV.

August 3, USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Dependent's Day Cruise.

August 24, CVN 73 departed homeport for a TSTA II in the Virginia Capes Op. Area.

September 2, The GW pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a six-day visit to Ft. Lauderdale. Underway for Type Training from Aug. 8-14.

From Sept. 21- Oct. 1, the carrier underway again for FRS-CQ and TSTA IV. Another underway off Virginia Capes from Oct. 14-21 for ammo onload and ORSE inspection.

November 1, USS George Washington departed Norfolk for Fleet Carrier Qualifications. Underway for TSTA III in the VACAPES Operating Area from Dec. 7-16.

January 19, 1994 The George Washington departed homeport for a Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Puerto Rican Op. Area.

U nderway for Fleet CQ in the Virginia Capes OPAREA from March 2-12 and March 21-25. Underway for Fleet exercise (FLEETEX) from April 6-22.

May 20, USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk for its maiden deployment.

June 1, The George Washington anchored off Portsmouth, England, for the first phase of 50th anniversary commemoration of the D-Day landings in Normany, France.

After a brief visit to Brest, France, the Washington entered the Mediterranean Sea to relieve USS Saratoga (CV 60) and take up station in the Adriatic, conducting no-fly-zone operations over Bosnia.

July 11, While operating in support of Operation Deny Flight, in the Adriatic Sea, black smoke is reported in one of GW's laundries. Fire crews quickly find out that the smoke is pumped into the space through the ship's ventilation system. Because of the unknown location of the fire the crew is ordered to general quarters and all inbound aircraft are diverted to shore bases in Italy. Shortly thereafter, flames are sighted on the aft starboard sponson and a fuel fire is located nearby. It takes almost one hour to extinguish the fire.

August 12, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off Haifa, Israel, for a five-day port visit.

August 20, USS George Washington anchored off the coast of Rhodes, Greece, for a four-day visit. The ship transited Suez Canal on 26th.

September 20, CVN 73 pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day visit to Dubai.

After transiting Suez Canal on Sept. 29, the George Washington returned to Arabian Gulf in early October in support of Operation Vigilant Warrior, in response to Iraqi troop repositionnig along the Kuwaiti border.

November 18, USS George Washington returned to Norfolk after a one day delay due to Hurricane Emily, completing the six-month deployment.

From Dec. 12-15, the GW was underway off the coast of Virginia for ammunition offload.

January 6, 1995 USS George Washington entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

April 7, The sixth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed shipyard for a five-day sea trials.

April 20, Capt. Malcolm P. Branch relieved Capt. Robert G. Sprigg as CO of CVN 73.

May 19, USS George Washington returned to homeport after an eight-day underway for CQ and ammunition onload with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) and USS Mount Baker (AE 34). VMFA-142 became the first Reserve Marine Attack Fighter Squadron to qualify as deployable unit of a Carrier Air Wing.

July 12, The George Washington departed Norfolk to participate in exercise Boastful Labor off the East Coast.

July 22, The aircraft carrier departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Family Day Cruise. Underway in the VACAPES Op. Area from Aug. 15-18.

September 21, USS George Washington departed Norfolk for a TSTA III and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) in preparation for Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

October 8, CVN 73 anchored off the coast of Ponce, Puerto Rico, for a three-day port visit. Returned to home on Oct. 27. Underway again from Nov. 2-7.

November 29, The George Washington departed Norfolk for a 17-day Joint Training Fleet Exercise (JTFEX) 96-1.

January 26, 1996 USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

February 11, The George Washington conducted turnover with USS America (CV 66), after transiting Strait of Gibraltar on March 8, and commenced flight operations in support of Operation Decisive Endeavour/Joint Endeavour on March 13, while on station in the Adriatic Sea.

February 26, The sixth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier anchored off Trieste, Italy, for a four-day visit. Port call to Marseille, France, from March 7-11.

March 16, CVN 73 entered the Red Sea after transiting Suez Canal.

April 6, USS George Washington pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day visit to Dubai. Another visit to Dubai from April 30 through May 6.

May 25, The GW arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a six-day port visit after participating in the joint exercise Matador.

June 4, USS George Washington anchored off the coast of Corfu, Greece, for a four-day visit. Capt. Kolin W. Jan relieved Capt. Ronald D. McElraft as CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW ) 7.

June 21, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off Naples, Italy, for a five-day port call. Port visit to Cannes, France, from July 1-9.

July 23, USS George Washington returned to homeport after a two-day Tiger Cruise from Bermuda, completing the six-month deployment.

August 29, The George Washington entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Navy's first ever Planned Incremental Availability (PIA), after offloading more than 2,000 tons of ordnance to the USS Seattle (AOE 3) and USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67).

February 28, 1997 CVN 73 departed NNSY for a nine-day sea trials after completing the six-month PIA.

March 25, USS George Washington departed homeport for a two-week Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II. Underway for ISE from April 28- May 2.

May 3, The George Washington departed Norfolk for a Family Day Cruise.

May 7, Capt. Lindell G. Rutherford relieved Capt. Malcolm P. Branch as commanding officer of the GW.

May 9, USS George Washington departed Norfolk for a TSTA III/FEP in preparation for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

June 1, The aircraft carrier departed St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, after a two-day visit.

June 19, USS George Washington departed Port Everglades, Fla., after a three-day port visit for COMPTUEX Phase II.

August 18, The Washington departed homeport for a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 97-3. Returned to homeport on Sept. 4.

October 3, USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk for its third major deployment.

October 16, The George Washington Battle Group conducted turnover with the John F. Kennedy BG, after transiting the Strait of Gibraltar on Oct. 15.

November 3, CVN 73 anchored off Haifa, Israel, for a week-long port visit.

November 20, USS George Washington entered the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch.

December 13, The sixth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day visit to Dubai.

December 31, Capt. Craig T. Cuninghame relieved Capt. John D. Stufflebeem as CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1.

January 15, 1998 USS George Washington arrived in Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a five-day port call.

February 6, Two F/A-18's, assigned to Marine Strike fighter squadron (VMFA) 251, collided in the Persian Gulf while returning to the ship after a routine patrol over the no-fly zone. Both aviators were recovered by SAR and flown back to the GW. Lt. Col. Henry G. Van Winkle died from injuries sustained in the accident.

February 12, The George Washington pulled again into Jebel Ali for a four-day R&R. The fourth and last visit to Dubai from March 1-5.

March 22, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Cannes, France, for a four-day port visit.

April 3, USS George Washington returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment in the Mediterranean and Arabian Gulf.

May 6, The GW returned to homeport after a two-day underway to offload ordnance to the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) and USS Arctic (AOE 8).

May 11, USS George Washington entered the Dry Dock 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a ten-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA).

December 10, CVN 73 mooved from dry-dock to Pier 5 at NNSY.

March 20, 1999 USS George Washington returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a two-day sea trials. Underway again for flight deck certification on March 25.

May 11, The George Washington departed homeport for a nine-day Fleet Carrier Qualifications.

June 12, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier underway for a Family Day Cruise. Underway again for CQ in the Virginia Capes Op. Area from June 21- July 2.

August 2, the GW departed Norfolk for CQ with the Training Command (TRACOM) in the Jacksonville OPAREA.

August 20, The Washington returned home after a two-day Tiger Cruise from Halifax, Nova Scotia. Airman Tavius Butler was lost at sea on the morning of Aug. 18.

September 16, USS George Washington emergency sortied from Naval Station Norfolk to evade Hurrican Floyd.

October 4, CVN 73 arrived in Port Everglades, Fla., for a four-day visit to Ft. Lauderdale to participate in Fleet Week. Returned home on 14th after a three-week underway for Carrier Qualifications.

October 24, The George Washington departed Norfolk for Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE).

From November 2-4, the GW received more than 2,000 tons of ordnance during the ammunition onload with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Supply (AOE 6).

November 16, Capt. William J. McCarthy relieved Capt. Lindell G. Rutherford as CO of the USS George Washington.

December 1, The aircraft carrier departed homeport for a two-week Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II with the CVW-17.

January 26, 2000 USS George Washington departed Norfolk for Fleet Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Virginia.

February 28, The George Washington underway for TSTA III/FEP and COMPTUEX in the Gulf of Mexico. Port visit to Key West, Florida, from March 18-21. Returned home April 7.

May 9, CVN 73 departed Naval Station Norfolk for a two-week Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) in the VACAPES Operating Area.

June 21, USS George Washington departed homeport for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

After three days of dropping inert bombs at newly reopened Vieques training ranges, off Puerto Rico, the carrier transited the Strait of Gibraltar on July 4.

July 10, After a three days of intense flight operations, the George Washington departed Adriatic Sea.

July 13, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier pulled into Antalya, Turkey, for a three-day port call.

After relieving USS Dwight D. Eisenhower in Central Command AoO on July 22, the GW entered the Arabian Gulf on 25th.

August 1, The George Washington pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day visit to Dubai.

August 11, The GW launched its first air strikes on targets in Iraq, in support of Operation Southern Watch.

August 20, USS George Washington anchored at Bahrain Bell-Sitrah for a five-day visit to Manama. The departured was delayed for one day after Flight 072 crashed near Bahrain Intl. Airport in the evening of Aug. 23, less than 10 miles from the ship's anchorage.

On Sept. 19, the CVN 73 was ordered to transit at "best speed" to the northern Ionian Sea, to provide a stabilizing presence in the aftermath of the volatile and unpredictable Serbian elections. Arrived on station on Oct. 2. Port visit to Corfu, Greece, from Oct. 5-8.

October 30, USS George Washington anchored off the coast of Dubrovnik, Croatia, for a four-day visit after participating in the largest NATO exercise of the year, Destined Glory, in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Port visit to Trieste, Italy, from Nov. 4-7.

November 17, The GW anchored off Naples, Italy, for a routine port visit.

December 5, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier arrived in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a three-day port call.

December 19, USS George Washington returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a six-month underway period. The aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 flew more than 9,000 sorties, of which 800 were in direct support of OSW, and made 9,000 arrested landings.

January 23, 2001 CVN 73 departed Norfolk to conduct ammunition offload with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Detroit (AOE 4).

January 28, The George Washington pulled into Naval Station Mayport for a brief port call to embark more than 500 "Tigers".

February 13, USS George Washington entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

July 26, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier returned to Naval Station Norfolk. Underway for sea trials from July 31- Aug. 3.

August 31, USS George Washington returned to homeport after a three-week underway period for flight deck certification and Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the Training Command (TRACOM) and Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS).

September 10, The GW departed Norfolk for Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) in Virginia Capes Op. Area. After a terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, the ship arrived off the coast of New York City and launched 234 sorties in support of Operation Noble Eagle, until returned home on Sept. 17. Underway again from Oct. 1-12 for Fleet CQ.

From November 2-20, the George Washington was underway for CQ and Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) I/II.

December 17, CVN 73 returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a 18-day underway for ammunition onload and ORSE.

January 29, 2002 The Washington departed homeport for FRS and TRACOM Carrier Qualifications.

February 6, A two-day search, off the coast of North Carolina, for a missing Seaman Apprentice David Wilse Parkhurst was called-off.

March 22, USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk for CVW-17 CQ, TSTA III/FEP and COMPTUEX/ITA.

On April 1, ships and aircraft of the GW Carrier Battle Group commenced use of the Vieques Island inner range in conjunction with their Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). The exercise also utilized the northern and southern Puerto Rican Operating Areas and will involve complex battle group training events, naval surface fire support training and air-to-ground bombing.

April 8, Capt. Martin J. Erdossy, III relieved Capt. William J. McCarthy as CO of the GW.

April 25, The sixth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, after a three-day port visit. Returned home May 7 after conducting JTFEX in VACAPES Operating Area.

June 20, USS George Washington departed Norfolk for its fifth major deployment.

July 4, CVN 73 pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, for a four-day port call to celebrate the Independence Day. The ship transited Suez Canal on July 12. Turnover with USS John F. Kennedy on July 19.

July 23, USS George Washington commenced its support in Operation Enduring Freedom.

August 28, The GW pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day visit to Dubai.

On September 11, USS George Washington was relieved by the Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Battle Group in the Arabian Sea. The aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 flew 925 comabt sorties in support of OEF in Afghanistan.

The GW BG transited Suez Canal on 16th and participated in a bilateral exercise Mediterranean Shark '02 with Morocco, Sept. 23-28.

September 29, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a three-day port visit.

October 17, USS George Washington arrived in Naples, Italy, for a four-day port visit after participating in the largest amphibious exercise, in Med. history, Destined Glory.

On Oct. 20, the CVW-17 sent a detachment to Pula, Croatia, to begin a training exercise with the Croatian Air Force.

October 28, CVN 73 arrived in Koper, Slovenia, for an four-day port call.

November 3, Lt. Cmdr. Robert Clukey, III, from "Blue Blasters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 134, was lost during a nighttime bombing training mision, after his F/A-18C Hornet crashed into the Aegean Sea, 85 miles north of Bari, Italy.

November 30, The GW pulled again into Souda Bay, Greece, for an eight-day port call.

December 20, USS George Washington returned to Norfolk after completing a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

January 24, 2003 The George Washington is currently underway for Carrier Qualifications (CQ).

February 2, Two SH-60F Seahawks, assigned to the Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 75, rescued four personnel from a burning merchant fishing vessel Diamond Shoal, off the coast of Jacksonville, Fla., while the GW was conducting TRACOM CQ. Five victims were recovered from the water.

February 25, CVN 73 entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia, for a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

August 13, The sixth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed shipyard for sea trials. Underway for flight deck certification from Aug. 21-27. Family Day Cruise on Aug. 29. Underway for CQ from Sept. 9-19.

September 11, An F/A-18D, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106, crashed into sea, off Virginia Capes, after the #4 arresting wire broke during lading aboard the GW. Lt. Rich Rivera ejected safely. Seven members of flight deck crew were injured.

September 23, USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) inspection.

October 16, USS George Washington departed for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA).

November 17, An F/A-18C, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136, and piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Gerry Murphy, recorded the 100,000th arrested landing aboard the GW.

November 21, Airman David M. Wilson is killed in an accident aboard the George Washington, at approximately 4 a.m. EST, when the aircraft tow tractor he was operating was involved in an accident in the ship's hangar bay, during which he sustained severe head injuries.

December 19, The Washington returned to Norfolk after a 40 days at sea, completing the Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

January 20, 2004 USS George Washington departed Naval Station Norfolk in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

From January 29-31, The George Washington conducted turnover with USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in the Atlantic Ocean.

February 6, The GW pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, for a four-day port call.

February 16, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier entered the Red Sea after a 16-hour transit through the Suez Canal.

February 28, CVN 73 entered the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.

March 14, The George Washington pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a five-day visit to Dubai.

On April 8, Hornets from Carrier Air Wing Seven commenced combat flights in support of Operation Vigilant Resolve, while the GW was on station in the North Arabian Gulf. One of the Naval Air Station Oceana-based "Wildcats" from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 131 conducted a 20-mm strafing run against an enemy position. Another VFA-131 Hornet dropped two 500-pound GBU-12 laser-guided bombs on another enemy position in Fallujah, Iraq, on April 9. This was the first live ordnance dropped by aircraft from CVW 7 on deployment.

May 7, USS George Washington arrived again in Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a five-day port call. Third visit to Dubai from June 11-15.

July 14, The Washington anchored off Naples, Italy, for a four-day port visit.

July 26, USS George Washington returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment.

From September 13-22, the aircraft carrier conducted CQ for the Naval Air Training Command (NAVTRACOM).

September 30, Capt. Gary R. White relieved Capt. Martin J. Erdossy as commanding officer of the GW.

From Oct. 15-22, the George Washington was underway for CSG Fleet Response Plan (FRP) Group Sail.

November 2, CVN 73 began a third underway period for the surge carrier since returning from deployment in July. With one underway remaining this year, the objectives will be obtaining FRS Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) and Training CQ, a substantial ammunition offload and an annual ORSE inspection.

On Nov. 3, the GW welcomed Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 122 "Flying Eagles", the Fleet Replacement Squadron for the Navy’s newest fighter, the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet. It was the first time the Super Hornets had been launched and recovered on the CVN 73.

July 25, 2005 USS George Washington reached a major milestone during its Docked Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) as Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard workers reinstalled the last of the ship's four propellers. This event marked the last significant work to be completed before flooding the dry dock and floating GW once again. The aircraft carrier entered the shipyard on Jan. 28 and plans to remain in Newport News through the end of the year.

September 1, USS George Washington completed an undocking and berthing shift at the NGNN shipyard August 30. The move was four days earlier than originally scheduled and was executed almost seven months after the ship arrived in the dry dock. The carrier moved out of the dry dock early in the morning and relocated to Pier 2. Scheduled maintenance, outfitting and testing will continue as part of the planned incremental availability.

November 19, The George Washington achieved another shipyard availability milestone Nov. 15, meeting the Topside Production Completion Date (TPCD), which was originally scheduled for Nov. 22. The GW replaced one Close In Weapons System and one Sea Sparrow missile launcher with new Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers. In addition to upgrades to Washington's weapons systems, improvements were made to the ship's communications, radar and computer systems. The aircraft carrier installed 1,000 new computers, 16 new servers and a new operating system on the ship's network.

December 2, The U.S. Navy announced today that the USS George Washington will replace the USS Kitty Hawk as the forward deployed aircraft carrier in the western Pacific and will arrive in Yokosuka, Japan, in 2008. This rotation is part of the Navy&rsquos long-range effort to routinely replace older ships assigned to the Navy&rsquos forward deployed naval forces with newer or more capable platforms.

December 17, USS George Washington returned to Naval Station Norfolk following a ten-and-a-half month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) period at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard.

February 16, 2006 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier returned to homeport following a two-and-a-half week flight deck certifications and carrier qualifications (CQ) for pilots from the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 and Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106.

March 1, USS George Washington is currently underway conducting carrier qualifications and shipboard training.

March 6, CVN 73 took another step forward in combat readiness as the ship conducted an at-sea ammunition onload in more than a year. Sailors in GW&rsquos weapons and deck departments moved more than 250 pallets from USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) to the flight deck and hangar deck during simultaneous connected replenishment (CONREP) and vertical replenishment (VERTREP), taking a little more than three hours to complete the transfer.

GW lent a helping hand to 45 naval aviation students March 6-10 during the training carrier qualifications (TCQ) process, which would lead them toward their final goal of becoming naval aviators. Joining the GW flight deck are Training Squadron (VT) 7 "Eagles" and the VT-8 "Tigers" from Meridian, Miss., and the VT-21 "Golden Eagles" and VT-22 "Redhawks" from Kingsville, Texas.

March 17, The aircraft carrier returned to Norfolk after successfully completed the first phase of its Tailored Ship's Training Availability. TSTA is a three-part training and testing evolution designed to increase a ship's readiness and effectiveness.

April 4, USS George Washington and embarked Carrier Air Wing Seventeen (CVW-17) departed Naval Station Norfolk as part of U.S. Southern Command&rsquos (SOUTHCOM) "Partnership of the Americas" deployment, for approximately two months.

April 14, CVW 17 completed three days of training and exercises at the Navy's Pinecastle Bombing Range in Florida April 10. The air wing utilized the Pinecastle Range to conduct unit-level training, air wing strikes, and combat search and rescue training. The purpose of the training was to give the air crews an opportunity to practice dropping live ordnance at the range. The Navy has used nearly 6,000 acres of the 382,000-acre forest for target practice for 50 years under a special use permit from the U.S. Forestry Service.

April 14, USS George Washington arrived in St. Maarten, Netherlands Antilles, for a four-day port visit.

May 1, Capt. Troy M. Shoemaker relieved Capt. William Massey as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the GW.

May 15, The George Washington anchored off St. John's, Antigua, for a three-day port visit.

May 24, USS George Washington returned to homeport after a seven-week deployment to the Caribbean in support of Partnership of the Americas. Throughout the deployment, the ship hosted dignitaries, military leaders and media representatives from various countries in the region including Colombia, Venezuela, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago, and Antigua. It also conducted operations and exercises with foreign navies in the region. The biggest of these, CARTAGENEX, was a bilateral exercise with the Colombian navy and air force.

July 16, CVN 73 is currently conducting carrier qualifications off the coast of Virginia. Returned to Naval Station Norfolk on July 24.

August 14, USS George Washington departed Norfolk to conduct training and offload all remaining ammunition during the ship's last scheduled underway period before heading to Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). GW&rsquos remaining ordnance will be offloaded via helicopter during a vertical replenishment.

September 1, CVN 73 returned to homeport following a two-and-a-half week underway period in preparation of the upcoming DPIA.

September 14, USS George Washington arrived in Norfolk Naval Shipyard after recently completed deperming, a process in which the ship is demagnetized. The aircraft carrier will spend the next year in the yards being refitted and upgraded during a scheduled yard period Entered the dry-dock on Sept. 28.

November 10, USS George Washington successfully marked its first milestone of the, $300 million worth, PIA as the ship's main mast was removed nearly three weeks ahead of schedule for the installation of the new capstone suite. In addition to replacing the main mast, the ship's radar and weapons systems will be replaced or upgraded. One of the upgrades in progress includes upgrading the close-in weapons system (CIWS) mounts to Block 1 Bravo. Additionally, the MK 23 Target Acquisition System (TAS), the fire control radar for the NATO Sea Sparrow missile system, will be seeing its own upgrade as the SPQ 9 replaces it.

December 14, Capt. David C. Dykhoff relieved Rear. Adm. Garry R. White as CO of USS George Washington during a change-of-command ceremony held in Norfolk.

April 25, 2007 The George Washington undocked and moored at pierside berth on Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY), one week earlier than previously scheduled.

August 27, USS George Washington returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for sea trials.

September 19, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier is currently underway for CQ and flight deck certification in preparation for a homeport change to Yokosuka, Japan Underway for TRACOM CQ from Oct. 22 through Nov. 1.

February 12, 2008 USS George Washington completed several live-fire exercises Feb. 7-9, in preparation of its scheduled transition to replace USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) as the Navy's only permanently forward-deployed aircraft carrier. GW is currently conducting carrier qualifications and flight deck certification off the East Coast.

March 14, The George Washington returned to homeport after completing Tailored Ships Training Availability and Final Evaluation Problem (TSTA/FEP) in the Atlantic Ocean. During the several weeks of training and evaluation, the GW CSG also participated in Canada's Task Group Exercise (TGEX) 02-08 with four Canadian ships and a submarine.

April 7, USS George Washington departed Norfolk Naval Station to the U.S. Southern Command to participate in Partnership of the Americas 2008. After approximately two months, the carrier will continue the transit to its new homeport of Yokosuka, Japan.

April 21, CVN 73 anchored off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for a four-day port visit before participating in a multinational exercise UNITAS 49-08.

May 10, After trainings with Brazil and Argentine navy, the Washington Strike Group transited the Strait of Magellan to participate in bilateral task group exercises with Chilean air and surface units.

May 14, USS George Washington anchored off the coast of Valparaiso, Chile, for a four-day port call.

May 22, At approximately 7:50 a.m. local time a fire was detected in the vicinity of the aft air conditioning and refrigeration space and auxiliary boiler room aboard the GW. The fire spread to several spaces via a cableway and caused extreme heat in some of the ship spaces, but it was contained and extinguished by the crew without any serious injuries to personnel. It took several hours to completely contain and extinguish the fire.

May 27, CVN 73 moored at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego for emergent repairs. The GW is en route to Hawaii for a turnover with the Kitty Hawk.

June 10, Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet announced June 9 the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) will replace USS George Washington in the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2008 exercise scheduled to take place in the Hawaiian operating area from June 29 through July 31. The timeline for repairs to the GW has not yet been determined.

June 19, The turnover ceremony originally planned for early June in Pearl Harbor will now take place in San Diego in August as a result of the fire that occurred aboard the Washington.

July 30, As directed by Adm. Robert F. Willard, Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific, Vice Adm. Thomas J. Kilcline, Jr., relieved of command CO Capt. David C. Dykhoff and XO Capt. David M. Dober after investigators concluded that a $70 million fire that damaged the ship in May probably was triggered by crew members sneaking a smoke. The fire was the worst of 13 reported aboard Navy ships this year. Capt. John R. Haley is new commanding officer of the GW.

August 21, The GW departed San Diego for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-5 off the coast of southern California.

September 25, USS George Washington arrived at its new homeport of Fleet Activities Yokosuka in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, as the United States' only permanently forward-deployed aircraft carrier.

October 1, USS George Washington departed Yokosuka for its first Fall Patrol in the western Pacific.

October 10, The George Washington departed Busan, Republic of Korea, after a three-day port visit due to 60th anniversay of the Korean government and its armed forces.

November 4, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed Apra Harbor, Guam, after a four-day port call.

November 17, The GW CSG is currently participating in Annual Exercise 2008 (ANNUALEX 20G), between the U.S. and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF).

November 21, USS George Washington returned to Fleet Activities Yokosuka after a seven-week underway period.

April 10, 2009 Capt. David A. Lausman relieved Capt. John R. Haley as CO of CVN 73 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship .

From May 6-15, The George Washington was underway for sea trials and carrier qualifications after a five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

May 20, USS George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for combat operations efficiency (COE) evaluation in the western Pacific.

May 23, Capt. Michael S. White, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, achieved his 1,000th carrier-arrested landing while flying an F/A-18F Super Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102.

June 10, USS George Washington departed Yokosuka for its first annual Summer Patrol.

July 2, The George Washington anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a five-day port visit Perth before participating in a biennial joint exercise Talisman Saber 2009.

August 6, The GW departed Changi Naval Base after a four-day port visit, its first ever to Singapore.

August 11, USS George Washington anchored off Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit, the first by a U.S. aircraft carrier in more than 13 years.

August 18, The George Washington CSG recently arrived off the coast of Manado, Indonesia, to participate in the Sail Bunaken 2009 regatta, an international event to share experiences and explore the marine beauty around North Sulawesi.

August 30, CVN 73 Carrier Strike Group began its participation in joint aircraft carrier operations, with USS Nimitz (CVN 68) CSG, in the western Pacific Ocean.

September 3, USS George Washington returned to homeport after a three-month underway period. Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Sept. 5.

October 6, The George Washington departed Yokosuka after a one-month maintenance and repair period for its second annual fall deployment in support of maritime security and to participate in ANNUALEX 2009 exercise.

October 13, USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group is currently underway in western Korean waters participating in a joint drill with Korea's Second Fleet. North Korea ratcheted up tensions by test-firing five KN-02 short-range missiles into the East Sea on Monday.

October 29, USS George Washington anchored in Victoria Harbour for its first ever port visit to Hong Kong.

From November 10-17, the GW CSG participated in Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 21G, off the coast of Japan.

November 23, USS George Washington returned to Fleet Activities Yokosuka after a seven-week underway.

December 5, More than 27,000 guests toured the George Washington during the "Open House" event at Fleet Activities Yokosuka.

May 11, 2010 CVN 73 departed Yokosuka for sea trials after a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA), performed by the ship's 3,000 Sailors, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard workers, and Japanese shipyard workers from Sumitomo Heavy Industries and the Ship's Repair Facility at FAY Moored at Berth 12 on May 14.

May 18, USS George Washington departed homeport for CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5.

May 29, Rear Adm. Dan Cloyd relieved Rear Adm. Kevin M. Donegan as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the GW. USS George Washington is currently conducting Combat Operations Efficiency (COE) evaluation in the western Pacific Ocean.

June 14, The GW departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Summer Patrol, just four days after completing the three-week underway period.

From June 21-25, USS George Washington participated in Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) with the U.S. and Japanese naval forces.

July 3, The GW returned to homeport to celebrate the 18th anniversary of its commissioning on Independence Day Underway again on July 9.

July 21, USS George Washington arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port visit before taking part in exercise Invincible Spirit in the East Sea.

August 9, The Washington CSG is currently participating in a week-long series of naval engagement activities with the Vietnam People's Navy, in the South China Sea, to commemorate the 15th anniversary of normalization of relations between the United States and Vietnam.

August 11, USS George Washington, along with the USS McCampbell (DDG 85) and USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93), moored at Changi Naval Base for a scheduled port visit to Singapore.

September 4, The GW anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit.

September 10, Cmdr. David Culpepper relieved Cmdr. Gerald J. Hansen as CO of the "Dambusters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 195, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

September 21, USS George Washington CSG, along with USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93), USS Crommelin (FFG 37), USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705), USS Buffalo (SSN 715), USS Tucson (SSN 770), USS Hawaii (SSN 776) and USS Defender (MCM 2), participated in a joint-service exercise Valiant Shield 2010 from Palau to Guam, from Sept. 12-21. The exercise concluded with a SINKEX that resulted in the sinking of the ex-USS Acadia (AD 42), a Yellowstone-class destroyer tender that was decommissioned in 1994. Acadia was struck by several missile and bomb strikes before being sunk by a torpedo dropped by HH-60H Seahawk helicopter from the "Chargers" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 14.

October 2, The George Washington, along with USS Cowpens (CG 63) and USS McCampbell, pulled into Laem Chabang, Thailand, for a five-day port call.

October 22, Capt. Daniel S. Cave, Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, achieved his 1,000th carrier-arrested landing while flying an F/A-18F Super Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102.

November 1, USS George Washington returned to homeport after four-and-a-half month western Pacific deployment. The return was delayed for five days due to Typhoon Chaba.

November 24, The Washington CSG departed CFAY to take part in the joint-bilateral exercise, Keen Sword 2010, from Dec. 3-10. The exercise is designed to increase the working relationship between the U.S. and Japan Self-Defense Forces and increase their ability to effectively and mutually respond to a regional crisis situation. USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group will first join Republic of Korea naval forces in the waters west of the Korean Peninsula, from Nov. 28 to Dec. 1, for joint naval drills.

December 14, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier returned to Fleet Activities Yokosuka. The GW will now undergo interior and exterior preservation, renovations and repairs during the Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) period.

March 21, 2011 USS George Washington departed homeport in response to the complex nature of the disaster that struck Japan on March 11. Low levels of radiation, from the heavily damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant, were detected by GW last week.

April 5, CVN 73 anchored off the coast of Sasebo, Japan, for a brief port call to onload supplies and equipment, and drop off more than 300 workers from naval shipyards in Bremerton and Norfolk.

April 12, The George Washington arrived again in Sasebo for a two-day port call to disembark another 150 Puget Sound and Norfolk Naval Shipyard workers and to bring aboard 115 Japanese that will continue the ship's routine maintenance at sea. Returned home on April 20.

June 5, USS George Washington departed Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka for sea trials and ammunition on-load.

June 12, USS George Washington departed Yokosuka for a routine Summer Patrol.

June 17, The "Dambusters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 195 returned to the flight deck aboard the GW, after completing the transition from the F/A-18C to the F/A-18E, marking a new chapter in naval aviation history. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 is now the first Wing to transition completely to the new and more advanced "Super Hornet".

July 6, CVN 73 entered the Indian Ocean after transiting through Sunda Strait.

July 15, Cmdr. Michael A. O'Leary relieved Cmdr. Michael B. Tatsch as CO of the "Gauntlets" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 136, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony. The aircraft carrier is currently off the northern coast of Australia participating in biennial exercise Talisman Sabre.

August 6, The GW pulled into port of Laem Chabang for a five-day visit to Pattaya, Thailand.

August 25, USS George Washington returned home after two-and-a-half month western Pacific deployment.

August 27, CVN 73 departed Yokosuka for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

September 19, USS George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a western Pacific patrol.

September 29, The George Washington arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port call to participate in the Armed Forces Day celebration.

October 13, USS George Washington moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a four-day port visit. The USS Dewey (DDG 105) and USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108) recently departed with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG and are currently attached to the GW Strike Group.

October 16, The Strike Group departed Singapore earlier than scheduled to better position themselves for potential humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations, if needed, in support of the government of Thailand following the worst flooding in many years.

October 31, USS George Washington, USS Tortuga (LSD 46), USS Cowpens, USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG 54), USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), USS Stethem (DDG 63), USS Lassen (DDG 82), USS Dewey, USS Wayne E. Meyer, USS Guardian (MCM 5) and USS Patriot (MCM 7), are currently participating in the bilateral Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX 23G), between the U.S. and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), from Oct. 27- Nov. 4.

November 9, USS George Washington arrived in Hong Kong for a five-day port visit.

November 15, Aircraft assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 136 completed their last set of arrested landings as part of the forward-deployed naval forces before transferring to Whidbey Island, Wash., to switch platforms from the EA-6B Prowler to the EA-18G Growler.

November 22, USS George Washington returned to Yokosuka after a two-month underway period.

March 25, 2012 CVN 73 welcomed aboard more than 11,000 guests during Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka's annual Spring Festival.

May 12, The George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a four-day underway to conduct sea trials and ammunition onload with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6), after a five-month Planned Maintenance Availability (PMA).

May 26, USS George Washington departed Yokosuka for a routine Summer Patrol.

June 13, Lt. Cmdr. Colin Price, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, recorded the 150,000th arrested landing aboard the George Washington.

June 22, The GW Carrier Strike Group (CSG) participated in a trilateral exercise with ships and aircraft from the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy, in the East China Sea, from June 21-22.

June 27, USS George Washington pulled into Busan, ROK, for a three-day port visit after participating in a joint exercise, in international waters west of the Korean Peninsula, from June 23-25.

July 3, Cmdr. Braden O. Briller relieved Cmdr. Steven M. Barr as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

July 10, The George Washington anchored in Victoria Harbour for a five-day port visit to Hong Kong.

July 14, Airman Rafael Martinez, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, died after falling overboard onto an adjacent services barge at 6:43 p.m., while the ship was at anchor in Hong Kong.

July 26, USS George Washington returned to FAY after a two-month underway period.

August 7, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier was underway for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment from Aug. 6-7.

August 11, Capt. Gregory J. Fenton relieved Capt. David A. Lausman as CO of the GW during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

August 20, USS George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a Fall Patrol.

September 12, The GW Carrier Strike Group is currently participating in an integrated training exercise Valiant Shield 2012, off the coast of Guam, from Sept 11-19.

September 21, CVN 73 moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port call.

October 7, USS George Washington pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a four-day visit to Kuala Lumpur.

October 24, The George Washington anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a five-day port visit.

November 8, The GW CSG is currently participating in ANNUALEX 24G, the maritime component of the biennial exercise Keen Sword 2013, between the United States and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, north off Okinawa, Japan, from Nov. 5-16 The aircraft carrier transferred more than 1,300 tons of ordnance to USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6), during an ammunition offload from Nov. 17-19.

November 20, USS George Washington returned to homeport after a three-month western Pacific deployment.

January 23, 2013 Rear Adm. Mark C. Montgomery relieved Rear Adm. J. R. Haley as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the GW.

February 7, The George Washington commenced a four-and-a-half month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) while moored at Fleeet Activities Yokosuka's Berth 12. Underway for sea trials and ammunition onload, with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10), from June 21-25.

June 26, USS George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol.

July 15, The GW Carrier Strike Group is currently participating in a biennial joint exercise Talisman Sabre 2013, off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

July 27, Cmdr. Jeffrey P. Holzer relieved Cmdr. Christopher G. Bailey as CO of the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

July 28, Cmdr. Cynthia A. Dieterly relieved Cmdr. Timothy T. Urban as CO of the "Liberty Bells" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony. Also, Cmdr. Shawn M. Kern relieved Cmdr. George M. Perry as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115.

July 29, USS George Washington moored at GrainCorp Terminal in Port of Brisbane, Australia, for a five-day port visit.

August 23, The George Washington returned to Yokosuka, Japan, after a two-month underway period in the western and southern Pacific.

August 24, CVN 73 departed homeport for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

September 13, USS George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a Fall Patrol.

September 25, USS George Washington, with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, completed a large-force exercise with the U.S. Air Force after coordinated eight days of joint service, air-to-air combat training with the 27th Fighter Squadron (FS), currently deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, and the 44th Fighter Squadron (FS) stationed at Kadena.

October 4, The GW CSG arrived in Busan Naval Base for a three-day port call after participated in a bilateral exercises with the Republic of Korea Navy, in the Sea of Japan, and will continue in the waters to the west off the Korean Peninsula through Oct. 13.

October 26, USS George Washington moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base for a five-day port visit to Singapore.

November 8, The George Washington anchored at WA2 in Victoria Harbour for a four-day port visit to Hong Kong.

November 11, CVN 73 CSG has been ordered today "to make best speed" to Republic of the Philippines in support of humanitarian relief operations, in the wake of a deadly Super Typhoon Haiyan that has left more than 10,000 dead Underway from Hong Kong on Tuesday afteernoon.

November 14, USS George Washington, along with USS Antietam (CG 54) and USS Cowpens (CG 63), arrived in the vicinity of the Leyte Gulf in support of Operation Damayan. The ships will go to a position just off the eastern coast of Samar Island in order to begin to assess the damage and provide logistical and emergency support to include medical and water supplies.

November 17, Two U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Ospreys, assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 262 and one from VMM-265, landed for the first time aboard the USS George Washington. The forward-deployed aircraft carrier is currently delivering water, medical and hygienic supplies to Guiuan/Samar, Ormoc, Borongan and Leyte Gulf.

November 22, Four E-2C Hawkeyes, previously assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 117 and deployed with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68), landed aboard the GW as part of an aircraft transfer between the "Wallbangers" and "Liberty Bells" of VAW-115 that was scheduled to provide upgrades to the Hawkeyes while still permitting the strike group to continue its fall patrol. USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group departed Philippines today after providing more than 335,000 liters of water and 36 tons of food and supplies in support of Operation Damayan.

From November 25-28, the GW Carrier Strike Group participated in Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 25G, with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, north off Okinawa, Japan Conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) from Dec. 2-3.

December 5, USS George Washington returned to homeport after a 12-week underway period in the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR).

January 6, 2014 The George Washington commenced a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) while moored at Berth 12 Underway for sea trials and ammo onload with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11) from May 19-23.

May 24, USS George Washington departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol.

June 14, Capt. William S. Koyama, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, completed his 1,000th career arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18E assigned to the "Dambusters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 195.

June 16, CVN 73 anchored at Western Anchorage (WA) 2 in Victoria Harbour for a four-day port visit to Hong Kong.

June 26, USS George Washington moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a four-day port visit.

July 10, Cmdr. David-Tavis M. Pollard relieved Cmdr. David Baird as CO of the "Dambusters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 195, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

July 11, The GW CSG moored at Berth 1 on Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port call before participating in a joint maritime exercise with the ROK and JMSDF Navy, off the Korean Peninsula, through July 20 Participated in a Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREX), south of Jeju Island, from July 21-22.

July 25, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier acted as a short-term sea platform in support of exercise Adiutrix Spear 14-2, while underway in the East China Sea, from July 23-25.

From July 26-30, USS George Washington, USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and USS Stethem (DDG 63) participated in a trilateral exercise Malabar 2014, with the Indian and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, in the waters east of Okinawa.

August 1, CVN 73 anchored in Sasebo Harbor, Japan, for a three-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

August 8, USS George Washington returned to Yokosuka after completing an 11-week patrol.

September 2, USS George Washington departed homeport for an annual Fall Patrol.

September 12, Cmdr. Michael D. France relieved Cmdr. Cynthia A. Dieterly as CO of the "Liberty Bells" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

From September 15-23, the GW CSG participated in a biennial field training exercise (FTX) Valiant Shield 2014, off the coast of Guam and Saipan.

September 28, Cmdr. Geoffrey P. Bowman relieved Cmdr. Shawn M. Kern as CO of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 2, USS George Washington moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a five-day port visit.

October 5, Rear Adm. John D. Alexander relieved Rear Adm. Mark C. Montgomery as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 5 and Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the GW.

October 5, CVN 73 emergency sortied from Apra Harbor to avoid the approaching Typhoon Vongfong. Transited the Basilan Strait westbound on Oct. 15 Transited Mindoro Strait northbound on Oct. 18.

October 21, Cmdr. Jason P. Young relieved Cmdr. Jeffrey P. Holzer as CO of the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 23, USS George Washington anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a brief port call Inport Apra Harbor again from Oct. 28- Nov. 1.

From November 11-19, The GW CSG participated in ANNUALEX 26G, the maritime component of the biennial exercise Keen Sword 2015, with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), north off Okinawa, Japan Conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11) from Nov. 22-23.

November 25, USS George Washington returned to Fleet Activities Yokosuka after a nearly three-month patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet AoR.

December 30, USS George Washington recently commenced a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

January 30, 2015 Capt. Timothy C. Kuehhas relieved Capt. Gregory J. Fenton as the 11th CO of George Washington during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

February 4, Huntington Ingalls Inc., Newport News, Virginia, was awarded a $224,4 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-2111) for the material and first year of advance planning of the USS George Washington's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). This modification will provide for the first year of RCOH advanced planning, shipchecks, design, documentation, engineering, fabrication and preliminary shipyard or support facility work and is expected to complete by February 2016.

May 11, The George Washington departed Berth 12 for a four-day underway to conduct sea trials and ammo onload with the USNS Washington Chambers.

May 18, USS George Washington departed Yokosuka, Japan, for a western Pacific patrol before heading to San Diego, Calif.

May 23, CVN 73 completed its CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the northern Philippine Sea.

June 12, Cmdr. David-Tavis M. Pollard, CO of the "Dambusters", completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18E Super Hornet, while the GW was underway in southern Philippine Sea.

June 19, USS George Washington moored at Grain Wharf in Port of Brisbane, Australia, for a five-day liberty visit Transited the Vitiaz Strait westbound on June 28.?

July 4, Cmdr. Kenneth P. Ward relieved Cmdr. Lonnie L. Appleget as CO of the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Molucca Sea.

From July 7-18, the George Washington CSG participated in a biennial joint exercise Talisman Sabre 2015, while underway in Timor Sea off the northern coast of Australia.

July 25, Cmdr. Rafe K. Wysham relieved Cmdr. Jason M. Denney as CO of the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Philippine Sea.

August 1, Cmdr. Jason S. Taylor relieved Cmdr. Ernest M. Winston as CO of the "Shadowhawks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony near the Hawaiian Islands.

August 7, Cmdr. Guy M. Snodgrass relieved Cmdr. David M. Pollard as CO of the "Dambusters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 195, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony. The GW arrived off the west coast today to disembark the CVW-5 aircraft to Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada.

August 10, USS George Washington moored at Berth L, Carrier Wharf on Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, Calif., after completing an eight-week patrol. The GW will conduct a 10-day crew and equipment swap with the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). The Reactor Department personnel will remain with their respective ship as well as a small number of personnel deemed critical to the ship&rsquos operations, including the commanding officers and XO's.

August 19, Rear Adm. Lisa M. Franchetti relieved Rear Adm. Patrick A. Piercey as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 73.

September 8, USS George Washington departed San Diego, after a four-day delay due to mechanical issues, for a three-month voyage to its new homeport of Norfolk, Virginia. The aircraft carrier will circumnavigate South America and participate in UNITAS exercise as part of Southern Seas 2015, a major component of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Partnership of the Americas.

September 21, USS George Washington, along with the USS Chafee (DDG 90), recently arrived in the U.S. 4th Fleet AoR Participated in a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the JS Yamagiri (DD 152), JS Kashima (TV 3508) and JS Simayuki (TV 3513) on Sept. 22.

October 3, The George Washington anchored off Callao, Peru, for a four-day liberty visit to Lima.

October 12, Cmdr. Benjamin P. Duelley relieved Cmdr. Jeremy Y. Rifas as CO of the "Black Eagles" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 113, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

October 13, USS George Washington anchored off the coast of Valparaiso, Chile, for a four-day port visit before participating in the Pacific phase of UNITAS.

October 19, Cmdr. Dennis M. Duffy, II relieved Cmdr. Brett A. Lassen as CO of the "Golden Dragons" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 192, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 22, USS George Washington anchored again off Valparaiso for a four-day port visit Entered the Strait of Magellan on Oct. 31 Anchored off Punta Arenas, Chile, from Nov. 1-2 Underway off the coast of Uruguay from Nov. 7-10.

November 14, CVN 73 commenced its participation in the Atlantic phase of UNITAS 56-15 exercise, while underway off the coast of Rio Grande, Brazil.

November 22, Cmdr. Shawn C. Kirlin relieved Cmdr. Roy A. Wylie as CO of the "Bounty Hunters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

November 23, USS George Washington anchored in Guanabara Bay, east of Enxadas Island, for a four-day liberty port visit to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

December 6, The George Washington, along with the USS McFaul (DDG 74), recently arrived in the waters off Guayana to provide a "stabilizing presence", ahead of the parliamentary elections in Venezuela Arrived off the coast of Virginia on Dec. 14.

December 17, USS George Washington moored at Pier 14 South on its new homeport of Naval Station Norfolk, after being forward-deployed to Japan for six-and-a-half years.

February 26, 2016 Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded a $205,1 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-2111) for the second year of advance planning of the USS George Washington's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). Work is expected to be completed by February 2017.

March 4, The GW departed Norfolk for a five-day underway to conduct Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-8 in the Virginia Capes Op. Area.

March 19, USS George Washington moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk after an eight-day underway for CVW-8/FRS/TRACOM CQ Underway for ammo offload with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) and FRS/TRACOM CQ from April 13-25 Underway again for FRS/TRACOM CQ and routine training from May 17- June 7.

June 13, Adm. William E. Gortney retired after 39 years of service during a retirement ceremony on board the George Washington at Pier 14N, Naval Station Norfolk. He served as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command and most recently as Commander, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM).

June 16, The George Washington departed homeport for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

From June 21-22, USS George Washington transferred nearly 1,200 tons of ordnance during an ammunition offload with the USNS William McLean (T-AKE 12), while underway off the coast of North Carolina.

From June 23-28, CVN 73 conducted testing of the Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Technologies (MAGIC CARPET), with the Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 Moored at Pier 14S on June 28 Underway for CQ with the Training Air Wing (TRAWING) 1 from July 10-17 Underway for FRS-CQ from July 18-22.

July 22, Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded a $194,8 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-2111) to extend the period of performance from 12 months to 18 months for continued advance planning of the GW's RCOH. Work is expected to be completed by August 2017.

July 29, Rear Adm. Bruce H. Lindsey relieved Rear Adm. John R. Haley as Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the George Washington at Pier 14S.

September 1, USS George Washington moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after an 18-day underway for Developmental Testing III (DT-III), off the coast of Virginia, with the Navy's F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft, assigned to the Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 and Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101.

October 1, The George Washington departed homeport for a Friends and Family Day Cruise Underway en route to the Caribbean Sea for Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Response (HA/DR) operations, in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, on Oct. 4.

October 5, THe GW recently embarked six MV-22B Ospreys, assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 365, and 12 MH/SH-60 Seahawks from the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 2, 5, 22, 26 and 28 Transferred four MV-22B, 150 Marines and relief supplies to USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) on Oct. 10 Returned to Norfolk on Oct. 20.

October 26, USS George Washington moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for FRS-CQ.

December 5, Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded a $41 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-2111) for advance planning of the GW's RCOH.

December 17, CVN 73 moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk after an 18-day underway for FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ).

February 17, 2017 Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded an $8.9 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-2111).

February 28, USS George Washington commenced a 12-week Shipboard Consolidated Offload and Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) phase, while moored at Pier 12 North.

June 5, Capt. Glenn R. Jamison relieved Capt. Timothy C. Kuehhas as the 12th CO of George Washington during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

August 4, USS George Washington entered the Dry Dock #11 at the HII Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va., for a four-year Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

September 1, Huntington Ingalls Inc., Newport News, Virginia, was awarded a $2,8 billion contract for the USS George Washington's RCOH. Work is expected to be completed by August 2021.

September 27, 2019 USS George Washington undocked and moored at Outfitting Berth #1 on Newport News Shipyard.

February 25, 2021 Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded a $31 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-16-C-4316) for the USS George Washington's RCOH. Work is expected to completed by May 2022.

June 24, Capt. Brent C. Gaut relieved Capt. Glenn R. Jamison as CO of the CVN 73 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.


This is why German submarines attacked civilian vessels during World War I

Posted On January 28, 2019 18:40:46

In retrospect, Germany’s decision to attack merchant ships and carry out unrestricted submarine warfare seems incredibly stupid. They knew – or should have known – that killing citizens of a neutral country (specifically the United States) even unintentionally was a damn good way to get America in the war on the side of the Allies.

Well, it turns out that Germany was relying on submarines to throttle British commerce. When the war started, the Germans had their submarines play by what had been the accepted rules of warfare when it came to merchant ships.

A German U-boat under fire during World War I. (Youtube screenshot)

You approached them, you got them to stop, and you allowed the passengers and crew to abandon ship before you sank the ship. When it came to warfare, it was reasonably civilized, given that you were sending those people from a relatively safe merchant vessel and into open lifeboats and rafts, with only oars and the ocean current for travel and not that much in the way of supplies.

As you might imagine, the folks on those merchant ships didn’t want to go through that kind of ordeal of they could avoid it. So, the British started by arming merchant ships. Soon the submarines were being fired on as they surfaced. The invention of the Q-ship made following the rules for submarines even more hazardous – and a good way for the sub to be sunk. When subs sank, the casualty rate amongst the crew often was 100 percent.

A U-boat’ victim starts its plunge to the bottom of the ocean. (Youtube screenshot)

German sub commanders didn’t want to have that sort of end-of-life experience. Nor did their crews, for that matter. So, the Germans decided to carry out unrestricted submarine warfare where they shot the merchant ships on sight. And thus began the chain of events that would bring the United States into World War I on the side of the Allies.

MIGHTY HISTORY

Watch the video: Antonov - 225: Το μεγαλύτερο αεροπλάνο στον κόσμο!


Comments:

  1. Elek

    I join. And I ran into this.

  2. Kirkly

    I confirm. It was and with me.

  3. Knox

    Great thought



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